"If you don't look good, we don't look good." That was the original mantra of hair impresario Vidal Sassoon, the mastermind behind the multi-million dollar brand that redefined hairstyles everywhere. Sassoon, who had leukemia, passed away in his LA home yesterday, dying of natural causes according to an LAPD spokesperson. Hailing from England, Sassoon was originally interested in soccer and fitness as a young boy, but was quickly guided towards a hairstyling apprenticeship after his mother had a premonition that he would become a hairdresser.

Architecture design heavily influenced Sasson's renowned shapely cuts that uniquely framed and suited the bone and facial structure of each client. He came into prominence by going against the grain, opting to forgo the big, stiff, teased hairstyles of the late fifties in place of wash-and-go styles that allowed for finger combing and a more youthful appearance. His claim to fame, giving actress and model Mia Farrow her infamous pixie cut for "Rosemary's Baby," placed Sassoon at the heart of pop culture, making him the go to stylist of the sixties. In addition to transforming the way hairdressers cut and styled hair, he also influenced the way they did business, as he was the first who had a product line bought out by a major corporation.

While his absence will surely be felt and missed in the industry, Vidal Sassoon has countless salons around the globe to which both men and women will continue to flock to transform themselves and simply look good.

Read it at NY Times.