Reports of a new “sex superbug” threatening the U.S. aren’t true, public health officials say, even as they reiterate worries about the rise of drug-resistant gonorrhea.

“The sky is not falling -- yet,” said Dr. Kimberly Workowski, a professor of infectious disease at Emory University in Atlanta.

Several media outlets, including The Associated Press, last week reported that a rare strain of gonorrhea known as HO41 had been detected in Hawaii. That would have raised alarms nationwide, signaling the first domestic sign of a strain that's been found to be resistant to ceftriaxone, an injectable antibiotic that is the last-resort treatment for the sexually transmitted infection.

But the Hawaii cases, first discovered in May 2011, were actually a different strain, H11S8, resistant to a different drug, the antibiotic azithromycin, state health officials confirmed. That’s been a known problem for a while, Workowski added. The AP later withdrew the inaccurate report
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Read it at MSNBC.