5 Tips to Start a Side-Hustle Business

There are two types of people in the world: those who wait for their ship to come in, and those who learn how to swim out to the ship. In this volatile economy, we need many more of the latter. We need people who’ve decided that their fate is not written for them, but written by them.  Among these are the entrepreneurs of this country.

Entrepreneurs are special. They refuse to see the obstacle in a situation, and instead see opportunity. They acknowledge their problems, but they never allow themselves to feel they’re powerless. Entrepreneurs possess a very unique blend of idealism and realism, as well as optimism. They strive for the most ideal situation and believe that it can become real. And if life knocks them down, they see it as nothing more than a temporary setback.

Many wonder if they’ll ever be able to start their own business. I am writing this for those individuals who are working a day job but need a little extra push to start their dream job. There are five tips for those currently working a current nine to five job, but who’d like to begin working their dream job.

1. Don’t Quit Your Day Job

Use the income from your day job not only your rent, but to invest in your business. If you have a day job and you want to create your own dream job, then the work starts as soon as you get home. No sleep for the weary as the future entrepreneur. You have to forgo a few nights of sleep to kick-start your dream. Many people quit their day job only to find out that it takes a lot longer to create your dream than expected. So before you quit, make sure you have substantial savings in the bank (at least nine-12 months of living expenses) and a predictable stream of income from your business. Then you can afford to leave the cushy, predictable salary check of your day job.

2. Be Selective About Your Job if Possible

Using the resources at your current nine to five might be beneficial in helping you create a solid platform for your dream business. So ask yourself the following:

  • Can you stay after work hours and utilize the Internet and computers to do the work for your business?
  • Are there any people you meet at your place of business who can assist you to grow your firm?
  • What skill sets have you learned on your day job that you can use on your business?
Then again, maybe you don’t have the luxury of being as selective about your nine to five, and have to continue there to keep your lights on. If this is your case, be sure to maximize your off hours and save as much money as possible!

Don’t start your business because you want a guarantee of success. Do it because you recognize that if you don’t at least try, you’re guaranteed to fail.

3. Find the Free Resources

The liquidity you earn from your job gives you the most precious commodity of all for a new entrepreneur: time. You can use the time you gain not worrying about bills to seek out resources that can assist your business. What resources do you have at your disposal? Perhaps you should be going to wix.com to build your free website, caffepress.com to sell your T-shirts, or squareup.com so you can accept credit card payments using your phone. Don’t worry about what you don’t have; focus on what you do have and make it happen!

4. Involve Your Friends and Family

Many times we overlook one of the most important resources we have: our family and friends. It only makes sense to tap into them, because they’re the ones most likely to support you! Talk to your siblings to see if they have an interest in assisting your vision. Have conversations with your parents, who may have years of experience to contribute. Or just take some work sessions with friends who also have their own side businesses.

5. Be Fiscally Responsible

Using your money wisely is crucial when starting your business. Liquidity doesn’t grow on trees, and if you’re spending all of your excess on Starbucks, eating out for lunch and financial splurges, the result will obviously be less capital for your business.

What’ll happen if you start a business? There is no guarantee of success. But don’t start your business because you want a guarantee of success. Do it because you recognize that if you don’t at least try, you’re guaranteed to fail. The economy depends on entrepreneurs believing they can be successful, and taking the steps necessary to become a success. So what are you waiting for?!