Anthony Mackie Stars in âPain & Gainâ[INTERVIEW]

Anthony Mackie at the Premiere of 'Pain & Gain' with co-stars

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his last option to be able to make it.

EBONY: What do you think that the real Adrian would think of your portrayal of him and this story, since you didn’t get a chance to meet him?

AM: I think he would appreciate it. The thing about this movie is, it made Adrian come off as best as he possibly could. There’s no other way someone in this position, committing this heinous of a crime, you would feel any kind of emotional sympathy for, other than the way he’s portrayed in this movie. So I would think that you would have to appreciate that. If gives some kind of dignity to a person who committed crimes that are undignifiable.

EBONY: On that note, a lot of the families of the real-life victims are really up in arms about the movie for that same reason. Because Adrian and [Mark Wahlberg's character, Daniel] Lugo will look at this and appreciate it, is there any harm in creating a film like that, considering that these families are boycotting the movie and asking others to boycott as well?

AM: The problem with that is that they haven’t seen the movie; they’re boycotting the commercials. I understand, I get it. If it was my family members, I would understand the reaction like that. But I don’t think in any way, shape, or form, that we dealt with their demise in a lighthearted way. I don’t think we took advantage of the people who were hurt in this whole process of them trying to get rich. I think we just told the story. If anybody who reads the story realizes how ridiculous it is--it’s not a slapstick comedy, this isn’t a Brendan Frasier movie--it’s a situational comedy. When you look at somebody doing this amount of ridiculous shit, it’s just funny. because you can’t believe it’s true. And that’s why, in the middle of the movie, Michael puts the line, “This is still a true story.” So I think it’s dealt with in a tasteful manner. I think it shows the absurdity of these three guys. And the people who were harmed just became byproducts of this absurdity.

We’re just telling the story. If we were pointing fingers and saying "they’re victims because they made themselves victims," or "it’s good that they’re victims," that’s something else. We’re definitely not saying that. If you watch the movie, you actually feel sorry for the people who get hurt and who are the victims. You see that in no way, shape, or form they they deserve to end up the way that they did. I think if you’re going to tell this story, this is probably the classiest way of telling it.

Catch Anthony Mackie in Pain & Gain premiering today.

Brooke Obie writes the award-winning blog DistrictDiva.com. Follow her on Twitter @BrookeObie.