BLACK MUSIC MONTH:<br />
Legends Speak

Narada Michael Walden, Teddy Riley and Larry Dunn

Page 5 of 5

the bathroom and he yelled at him and said, ‘NO!’ Stevie has all kinds of stories like that and many of us do. We have to understand how much of a task it has been for them to succeed against all of those odds. These guys put their lives on the line and it wasn’t just for a top ten record. We really have to thank these legends.

TR: It means a lot because I’ll never forget our pioneers who paved the way for all of us. I’ll never forget the beauty of our Black Music. Our records are classics. I’m happy to say that my records are considered classics as well. When kids start hearing the music of our pioneers and great musicians, they begin to love it. We have to get them to this music. A lot of them don’t know what our heroes have done and some of them don’t even know my music, but when they hear it they love it. They begin to ask questions and do research on our music.

LD: It is great thing that Black Music doesn’t go unnoticed. Back in the day, if you were an artist of color you would have to go overseas to really get your props. This goes back to Josephine Baker, Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, and a lot of the greats. To be able to have a Black Music Month is a wonderful thing because it puts many great artists at the forefront for people to see and examine. For every generation, they may have forgotten certain music and it gives them a chance to google it and go online to purchase it and become enlightened.

Chris Williams is an internationally published journalist that has written feature articles covering the topics of politics, race, culture, entertainment, and world events. His work has been seen in 200 different newspapers and various magazines. You can follow him on Twitter @CWmsWrites