The âSix Little McGheesâ Are Back! [INTERVIEW]

The McGhee Family

"It's like a journey of stages," Mia McGhee tells  me when I ask her what life has been like for the mother  of sextuplets in the year since we last spoke. "You get used to one stage and they're just on to the next one. It was the terrible twos, now we're in the really trying threes."

"It's worse than twos," her husband of 14 years, Rozanno McGhee, chimes in. "These kids are talking back, they're telling you, 'no'. At home, they get a little rowdy, but out in public, they turn it up times 10." We're trying to find a quiet table in the lounge of their New York hotel, but there's no such thing as quiet anymore, when you've got six three-year-old children. The adorable tots, four boys and two girls, had been shuffled into the lounge like baby ducks behind their parents, monkey backpacks with leashes strapped on tight. With the help of two young ladies, the kids were distracted with juice and animal crackers while EBONY.com caught up with Mia and Ro to talk about how they keep their romance alive and what we can expect on season two of their reality show, Six Little McGhees, premiering on OWN this Saturday at 10/9c.

EBONY: Your kids are growing up! So now, in this stage, can you see all their individual personalities?

ROZANNO MCGHEE: Big time.

MIA MCGHEE: Before, you never really had to exercise punishment, but now, I don't even know if you can punish them. How do you? Time out? You just need to like give them a break and hopefully they'll chill out. And then try again to reacquaint them with the group.

EBONY: Ro, I heard you saying that three of them are potty trained and the other three are not, so what's that like, juggling them at these different stages?

RO: It's difficult. Right now, you've got to know their personalities you learn their language. Sometimes it's words and sometimes it's non-verbal. They'll pat their bottom and I know what that means. You take them to the potty and they'll show you their potty but you've really got to have control because they'll all try to head for the potty at the same time. Like yesterday, I had two kids behind me wanting to potty and one kid standing right in front of me pooping on the floor. [Laughs] So, it's like, how can I do this? How can I get through this? And we just take it one day at a time. We work together.

MIA: I don't know what I'd do without him.

RO: You know what, I always say this, Mia has the voice. She's like "sit down! Ro, go upstairs!" And I'm like, "All right, here I go." [laughs]

MIA: He's more chill. I'm like very edgy now that I've had the kids. Before, I was a little more relaxed but now with the kids, my stress level is, whew!

RO: I was with her for 10 years before we had the kids and I stay out of her way. So now when it's time for discipline, I say, do your thing. But it's team work. I don't know what I'd do without her. She's an awesome mother, an awesome wife and we just work together. We have a compromise.

EBONY: Last year when I talked with you, you were adjusting to reality television and running the business that you have together and the children, so what has this past year been like for you?

MIA: Whew!

RO: Overwhelming. When it comes to your family, you want your family to be in order and everything to be together, and that's not the case [when you have six children]. So, that's a job in itself and we're first-time parents and we're still mastering it. Like every stage is a different stage. So, we just work together and try to figure it out.

MIA: That's why I just said it's a journey of stages.

RO: When it comes to marriage, she's always been my best friend, my girlfriend my wife without children and now she's a mother. And I'm getting used to that, as well.

MIA: That's something, too. I knew him as Rozanno, my husband, but I didn't know him as a father, so that's a new role, how do you adjust to that? Like I said, before I was a little more laid back, but now I'm a mother and I'm much more on edge.

RO: And I'm like, who is this woman? [Laughs]

EBONY: And how is he different as a father?

MIA: I don't know, he's just, I don't care how bad of a day he's had, I don't care what he's been through, when he sees his kids, he lights up. He loves his boys. Four boys? This is like a dream for him. You can just see, that's like, pride on his face.

RO: It really is. My quiver is full!

MIA: