Mandingo Myth

Mandingo Myth

Mike Stallion’s oh-so-candid song “My Small Penis” shed light on size shaming in the Black community. EBONY talks to both the reality show moonlighter and a medical expert about this huge topic.

by S. Tia Brown, December 7, 2015

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Mandingo Myth
The big Black d**k is not a myth—but it has been grossly exaggerated. 
That’s good news for Michael Forbes, aka Mike Stallion, whose song “My Small Penis” became a social media hit after airing during an episode of the Lifetime reality series Atlanta Plastic. On the show, Forbes, a husky Black male standing 6 feet 2 inches tall, asked plastic surgeons to enlarge his penis because he believed it was too tiny for his stature. “It’s 4 inches when erect,” the 30-year-old tells EBONY. “I first realized it was an issue in high school. When I started dating, I’d hear comments such as, ‘Is that it?’ or ‘Is it hard?,’ especially because of all of the stereotypes about Black men being well-endowed.” Forbes believed a bigger penis would change his sex life. But the doctors refused to do a penile enlargement procedure because of concerns that it would impact his overall sexual function. In their opinion, his penis worked, it was just shorter than average and he had to learn how to get a handle on it (pun intended).
 
According to a study published by the scientific journal Personality and Individual Differences, statistically, African men do have larger penis sizes than those from other continents—but we’re talking an average of 6 to 7 inches in length compared with 4 to 5 inches. With those facts in mind—and Mandingo tales aside—it’s simply unrealistic to expect to be greeted by the much-fabled “8-to-12-inch elephant trunk” every time you unzip a brother’s slacks.
 
“Penises come in all shapes and sizes,” says Draion Burch, a board-certified OB/GYN and the author of 20 Things You May Not Know About the Penis. “Length and width are largely determined by genetics, and most men reach their ultimate size around age 16.” When it comes to genital length and a woman’s ability to achieve an orgasm, Burch contends that size does not matter.  “Achieving an orgasm has more to do with how you make love. A G-spot orgasm may not be an option due to length, but you can reach climax through oral or anal sex, or clitoral stimulation.  If you have concerns about size, I suggest incorporating sex from the back or anal sex, because stimulation of the perineal sponge, between the vagina and the anus can create an explosive orgasm.”
 
Read more in the December 2015/January 2016 issue of EBONY Magazine. 
 
 
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