[TALK LIKE SEX] Rules of Office Romance
Page 2 of 2

conduct, so it’s important you familiarize yourself with them. While companies can’t prevent you from getting involved with someone you work with, they can set rules on interactions, particularly between supervisors and subordinates. Interestingly enough, a study found that while HR managers generally find no problem with office romances, people who have same-sex relationships are often subject to more negative perceptions and backlash, because of overall negative views about homosexuality in general. It’s unfair, but an unfortunate reality in the workplace, where only 16 states protect members of the LGBTQ community from workplace discrimination.

What should you do? Regardless of your decision, be careful! Jobs are entirely too scarce to take risks that can lead to you losing your job over a few toe-curling orgasms. But I don’t want to dissuade you from finding “The One,” who might be working three offices down the hall. If you’re only looking for a friend with benefits, I recommend you focus more on the “friend” and steer clear of a “co-worker with benefits” situation that might cost you more important benefits. It’s tricky and it’s your call. As always, think it through, communicate boundaries with your potential work boo, and be safe!

*Names have been changed to protect the guilty.

Feminista Jones is a sex-positive Black feminist, social worker and blogger from New York City. She writes about gender, race, politics, mental health and sexuality at FeministaJones.com. Follow her on Twitter at @FeministaJones.