Andrea Jenkins made history as the first Black openly transgender person elected to public office in the 2017 election.

On Anniversary of Trump’s Election, Minorities Begin to Take the Govt. Back

History upon history upon history.

by Zahara Hill, November 8, 2017

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Andrea Jenkins made history as the first Black openly transgender person elected to public office in the 2017 election.

Women's March/Twitter

It’s been a harrowing year since Donald Trump was elected U.S. President. Since then, the hope which Barack Obama was so adamant — and effective — in instilling in his constituents has been gradually diminishing — until Tuesday night when a number of states held historical mayoral, gubernatorial and state legislative elections.

Seven cities elected their first Black mayor, including a Liberian refugee, a Black, openly transgender woman was elected to public office for the first time in the nation’s history and New Jersey elected its first Black lieutenant governor and its first Sikh mayor among other milestone victories.

According to FiveThirtyEight, Tuesday’s election results are possible indicators of the outcomes for 2018 congressional races. Below are some of the precedent-setting politicians ensuring minorities get a seat at the table.

Andrea Jenkins

Jonathan McCollar

Ravinder S. Bhalla

Mazahir Salih

Yvonne Spicer

Melvin Carter

Ryan Songalia

Danica Roem 

Lawana Mayfield

Wilmot Collins

Kathy Tran

Cathy Murillo

More great reads

 
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