Man Monitored for Two Years May Be FBI’s First ‘Black Identity Extremist’

Man Monitored for Two Years May Be FBI’s First ‘Black Identity Extremist’

So they were really serious about this dogwhistle foolishness?

by Zahara Hill, February 6, 2018

Man Monitored for Two Years May Be FBI’s First ‘Black Identity Extremist’


Just days before violent White supremacists gathered in Charlottesville in August for the “Unite the Right” rally, the FBI was putting the final touches on a document which birthed a term vilifying Black people frustrated by police killings.

Black Identity Extremist is a terrorist classification which paints those indignant by incidents of police brutality as threats to law enforcement. Despite the Charlottesville rally having led to the deaths of two state troopers last year and evidence that White nationalists pose the gravest danger to police, in December, the FBI indicted a Texas resident to validate their creation of the dogwhistle term.

In mid-December, the FBI raided a Dallas, TX apartment in which Christopher Daniels lived with his 15-year-old son. Foreign Policy first reported on Daniels on Jan. 30. According to the publication, FBI has not confirmed or denied whether Daniels is being detained as a Black Identity Extremist. But they have been tracking Daniels since 2015. The Texan reportedly caught the FBI’s attention after a video of him partaking in a protest was posted to the conservative and conspiracy-theorizing website InfoWars. Daniels, who goes by Rakem Balogun, is also the founder of the Huey P. Newton Gun Club.

As Daniels was left to stand outside in his underwear with his son, police confiscated two guns and Robert E. Williams book Negroes with Gun from the home. Because of a 2007 misdemeanor domestic assault conviction in Tennessee, Daniels possession of the firearms were illegal.

Daniels resides in the same town as Micah X. Johnson. In the summer of 2016, the army veteran shot five police officers shortly after the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile. The FBI claimed Daniels heralded Johnson’s acts on his Facebook page. Johnson’s killings were among the scarce pieces of evidences used by the FBI in the August report to dignify the need to frame Black communities as a threat to law enforcement.

He remains in police custody on the unlawful possession of a firearm. If convicted, he could face up to 10 years in prison.

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