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Poll: Black Americans Fear They’ll Be Worse Off with Trump

Survey reveals pessimistic sentiments from all races and ethnicities regarding Trump

by #teamEBONY, January 18, 2017

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We are just two days away from president-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration and young Americans have a deeply pessimistic view about his incoming administration.

A new Black Youth Project GenForward poll of Americans aged 18 to 30 found that the country’s young adults are more likely to expect they’ll be worse off at the end of Trump’s first term than better off.

70 percent of Black Americans think Trump’s presidency will lead to a more divided nation. 72 percent of Latinos, 66 percent of Asians and 52 percent of Whites shared the same sentiment.

Key findings:

  • About 2 in 3 African-Americans, Asian-Americans and Latino/as say both the lives of people of color will get worse and the lives of Whites will improve under a Trump administration
  • African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Latino/as are more likely to believe they personally will be worse off than better off in four years while Whites are divided
  • Whites are more likely than other racial and ethnic groups to say Trump’s election will improve the lives of the middle class and working class
  • Across races and ethnicities, many expect the lives of women and poor people to become worse

Survey participants were also asked about President Obama’s legacy. Across all racial and ethnic groups, majorities approve of Obama’s performance and view him positively with 86 percent of African-Americans, 82 percent of Asian-Americans, 78 percent of Latino/as and 56 percent of Whites approving of his eight years as president.

The poll, which was conducted last month, used a sample drawn from the probability-based GenForward panel. The panel is designed to be representative of the U.S. young adult population. The margin of error for all respondents is plus or minus 4 percentage points.

Respondents were first selected randomly using address-based sampling methods, and later interviewed online or by phone.

Click here for a summary of the report.

 
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