Munroe Bergdorf

Model Fired From L’Oréal For Condemning White Supremacy Lands Gig At Rival Company

Mama's got a new gig.

by Zahara Hill, September 13, 2017

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Munroe Bergdorf

In late August, L’Oréal Paris U.K. fired its first transgender model Munroe Bergdorf after she made a social media post speaking to the realities of White supremacy. But now, mama’s got a new gig with L’Oréal rival makeup brand Illamasqua.

Just a week after Bergdorf tweeted a picture of herself citing Maya Angelou’s “Still I Rise,” the 29-year-old proved would indeed be continuing on the upwards trajectory she alluded to not long ago. In a Tuesday Instagram post, Bergdorf announced that she is the fresh face of an Illamasqua campaign.

Excited to announce that I'm one of the faces of the next @illamasqua campaign. #illamafia

A post shared by Munroe Bergdorf (@munroebergdorf) on

Bergdorf was fired from L’Oréal on August 31 after the company was made aware of a Facebook post she’d written in response to the August White supremacy rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Her termination infuriated social media users and former L’Oréal model Claro Amfo even resigned from the company just days later in protest of her former colleague’s firing.

“Honestly I don’t have energy to talk about the racial violence of white people any more,” Bergdorf wrote in the Facebook post. “Yes ALL white people. Because most of ya’ll don’t even realise or refuse to acknowledge that your existence, privilege and success as a race is built on the backs, blood and death of people of colour. Your entire existence is drenched in racism. From micro-aggressions to terrorism, you guys built the blueprint for this s**t.”

The cosmetics company claimed Bergdorf’s post wasn’t in adherence with their diversity values.

“By firing me for speaking out against white supremacy, L’Oréal has implied that calling someone a racist is worse than actually being one,” Bergdorf wrote in an a Broadly essay published last week. “But coming out of all of this, I strongly believe this instance speaks volumes about the true motives of brands and empowerment campaigns. You can’t just use the images of people of color to profit from an untapped demographic; you need to actually support the people you are representing.”

Stay glistening and empowering, sis.

 
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