Good Medicine

INSPIRATION BY THE CUP

Got writer’s block? A spot of tea might help you fill that page. New York literary agent Regina Brooks says she found herself more “centered” and creative after drinking her master brews made of florals and herbs. So she partnered with a world-renowned tea expert and leading herbalist to develop Creativitea, Claritea and Productivitea—a tribology of teas that could possibly reboot the imagination. To learn more, visit possibiliteas.co.

HELP FOR CENTRAL NERVOUS  SYSTEM DISORDER VICTIMS 

Two new devices have been FDA-cleared that may, over time, improve the mobility of those with central nervous system disorders including MS and strokes. Bioness Inc. has developed externally worn neurostimulation systems designed to restore foot and hand function. Clinical evidence suggests the NESS L300 System, which attaches to the shoe and below the knee, may enable some patients to increase walking speed and balance. The NESS H200, worn on the arm, improves voluntary movement in the hands. Additional information can be found at bioness.com.

PEDESTRIANS WEARING  HEADPHONES OR EARBUDS WERE INJURED OR KILLED BY VEHICLES  FROM 2004 TO 2011.

Stepping out for a stroll? Consider leaving your iPod or MP3 player at home—or at least not plugged into your ears. Between 2004 and 2011, there were more than 100 accidents in which pedestrians who wore headphones or earbuds were injured or killed by vehicles. About two-thirds were younger than 30; more than one-third were under 18. The report, published online in Injury Preven-tion, found that our ability to tune into our surrounding environment is hindered when we’re distracted by what’s thumping in our ears.

COULD SOME GOSSIP BE GOOD FOR YOU?

A University of California study shows that one kind of gossip can have social and psychological advantages. Research-ers discovered that when a person sees bad behavior, his or her heart rate increases—but passing on the information to others actually tempers that physical response and lowers stress and maintains social order by policing bad behavior. Scientists call this “pro-social” gossip, which is different from the “Beyonce baby bump” variety.

ANOTHER REASON TO GO RED

Drinking red wine in moderation has been long noted as a healthy habit, but is it the alcohol or the grape’s antioxidants that make us less prone to heart attack and stroke? A study published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition served up a goblet of good news: It’s actually both. When participants drank red wine, with and without alcohol, the level of chemicals that can lead to plaque forma-tion in the heart was lowered.