Concord grapes and grape juice may contribute to a healthy lifestyle by promoting cardiovascular and cognitive health.

Concord grapes and grape juice may contribute to a healthy lifestyle by promoting cardiovascular and cognitive health.

Fruitricious
Some great news for all you red and purple grape lovers: A new study in Nutrition Today presents evidence that Concord grapes and grape juice may contribute to a healthy lifestyle by promoting cardiovascular and cognitive health. Findings also showed improvement in memory and increased blood flow in specific regions of the brain. Visit grapescience.com.

21%
Percentage of diabetes sufferers who have gastric bypass surgery and become diabetic again within three to five years.
Although gastric by-pass surgery has helped many type 2 diabetics reverse their disease, it’s not a perfect solution: A new study shows that 21 percent of diabetes sufferers who have the procedure again become diabetic within three to five years after the operation. The study showed that the longer a participant had diabetes before the surgery, the higher the likelihood that diabetes would recur.

Smile Away Stress
The next time you’re not feeling up to grinning and bearing it, do it anyway. Studies have shown that smiling influences our physical state, because it helps to reduce the intensity of the body’s stress response. Published in Psychological Science, the study also found that smiling during stressors was worth the effort.

Gratitude Does a Body Good
Teens who count their blessings actually boost their positive mental health. A study, presented during a meeting at the American Psychological Association, showed that teenagers who learn appreciation have a greater sense of purpose, understand what matters most in life and use this energy to move toward their goals.  Displaying gratitude can increase happiness, academic performance and life satisfaction.

Lying Linked to Anxiety
Here’s one more reason why honesty really is the best policy: Research shows that stretching the truth not only damages relationships, but it also takes a toll on our bodies in the form of stress. The report, presented during an American Psychological Association meeting, reveals that participants who reduced their number of lies had fewer headaches and sore throats and less anxiety.The study’s authtor, Anita Kelly, who is a professor of psychology at the University of Notre Dame said, “I think white lies are trouble, not just major lies. ... What people can do is to commit themselves to lying less”