Black-Owned Food Trucks Give New Meaning to Meals on Wheels

Black Entrepreneurs Start Popular Food Trucks

The Root reports on NeatMeatDC, Hot Box Next Level Street Food, and Goodies Frozen Custard & Treats

by The Root, November 20, 2014

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Black-Owned Food Trucks Give New Meaning to Meals on Wheels

Black-Owned Food Trucks Give New Meaning to Meals on Wheels

Once a month from April through October, in a vacant Washington, D.C., lot near the famed Nationals Park, about 20 food trucks convene for an evening of music, food and dancing. Hundreds of D.C. locals have the opportunity to purchase everything from lobster rolls to Korean tacos, from homemade ice cream to gourmet hot dogs. One thing you quickly notice while trying to figure out which 20-minute line to endure for your next culinary experience is the demographics of the food-truck owners.

Food trucks have become a big business—some may even refer to them as the next big thing in culinary fads—but if you’re attempting to find food trucks owned by Black people, it’s similar to seeking the figurative needle in a haystack. But not impossible.



Nnamdi J. Nwaneri is one of the owners of NeatMeatDC, and his food truck is one of the few Black-owned trucks in the D.C. area. NeatMeatDC started in 2007, when Nwarneri teamed up with his Howard University law school classmate Na’Im Moses. The two men realized they had similar goals outside the law profession.





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