meek mill

Update:

Meek Mill has decided to cancel his White House trip after the focus of his visit became overshadowed by people’s disdain for President Donald Trump. In a statement sent to EBONY, the rapper said:



“I was originally scheduled to be part of a panel on Prison Reform at the White House to help shed light on the issues within the system. Unfortunately, the focus turned to the President and myself which concerned me that it might take away from creating a positive result from today’s discussions. As a result, I decided not to attend, so that the focus would be solely on fixing our prison system. Most importantly, I remain fully committed to improving our criminal justice system.”

Original:

Meek Mill is scheduled to visit the White House later today (May 18) according to reports from TMZ, but the news site is unclear who the rapper is set to meet.

Sources close to Meek, 31, told TMZ the subject of the meeting is reportedly prison reform. They did not reveal if the “Wins & Losses” rapper would be sitting down with President Donald Trump or someone else from the White House administration. Despite the meeting allegedly being about changing the prison system, multiple sources have urged Meek not to go.

The rapper was released from prison last month after receiving a 2-4 year sentence for probation violation —  for popping a wheelie in an Instagram video without wearing a helmet. He served five months for the violation, and many argue it was an unfair ruling from the judge who has been accused of unethical treatment of the rapper.  While Meek has been on probation for more than a decade, he is currently fighting to get his original conviction overturned. Since coming home, the Philly native has used his platform to speak about how the criminal justice system is biased in its treatment of people of color, especially those with limited resources. He is working on a six-part docuseries with Roc Nation and Amazon Prime that will chronicle his rise to fame, the Philadelphia court system and the high incarceration rates for people of color.



You may also like

Comments

Comments are closed.