Journey Jamison

Gun violence in Chicago has been a big topic of discussion, but little is said about the lack of a trauma center or quick access to health care for victims of gun wounds. Some individuals needlessly die not because of being shot but because the time it takes for them to get care. One 16-year-old by the name of Journey Jamison is taking the fight to save lives into her own hands.

Jamison received training in first aid guidance from Ujimaa Medics, a Black health collective based in Chicago. The”street medics”program is teaching people in the community how to respond to public traumatic events. Because of her training, Jamison at the age of  15 was able to save the life of a young man who knocked on her door after being shot in the neck in 2016.

“When you’re from Chicago, you become a little desensitized to a lot of the trauma and violence that surrounds you. So when it was on my front door, when it was in my living room, I could only be grateful that I had the training that I had,” Jamison said in a video for Mic.

Now the teenager trains people in her community on the lessons she has learned. She even taught Peda—the gunshot victim she saved—the techniques to help in an emergency.

“I never thought about it like I saved his life, but I took that opportunity to say, ‘Hey Peda, guess what? I was able to save your life because I had this training,’” said Jamison. “‘How awesome would it be if I could train you and your family or your friends on the same thing?’ Peda’s family and his close loved ones have been no stranger to gun violence, so he was extremely on board with learning.”





Comments
 
Stay in the Know
Sign up for the Ebony Newsletter