Flint residents Marcus Shelton, from left, Roland Young, and Darius Martin walk on an ice-covered street as they retrieve free water. AP

Black Caucus Asks Trump When Flint Will Get His Help

Three years after the Flint Water Crisis began, the Congressional Black Caucus wants to know if the president's infrastructure promises will be kept

by #teamEBONY, April 27, 2017

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Flint residents Marcus Shelton, from left, Roland Young, and Darius Martin walk on an ice-covered street as they retrieve free water. AP

Flint residents Marcus Shelton, from left, Roland Young, and Darius Martin walk on an ice-covered street as they retrieve free water

Associated Press

During his campaign, President Trump made promises to fix the nation’s infrastructure, saying he could get as much as $1 trillion to do so. Now, the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) is asking what he will do going forward regarding one of the biggest examples of infrastructure failure in the country: the Flint Water Crisis.

In a letter sent to Trump on Tuesday, Reps. John Conyers and Brenda Lawrence, who represent Detroit and Southfield, Mich., and Rep. Cedric Richmond, who represents New Orleans and is chairman of the CBC, said they are seeking a briefing for “an update on your long-term plans to assist the residents of Flint and ensure this tragedy is not repeated in other cities around the country,” MLive.com reported.



The Environmental Protection Agency gave a $100 million grant to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality to fund drinking water infrastructure upgrades in March. But the caucus said more must be done to ensure that Flint has the long-term capacity necessary to recover from this crisis,” according to the letter.

The letter was sent on the third anniversary of the beginning of the crisis when the Flint River became the drinking water source for the industrial city about an hour north of Detroit. Residents had been using bottled and filtered water at least since January 2016 because of toxic material the system caused by old corrosive pipes. The city is now getting its water from the Great Lakes Water authority, which transmits from Detroit. But the legal, health and political problems stemming from it remain.

The CBC says it is concerned about budget cuts that Trump is proposing that would affect several agencies that are crucial to situations like theirs including the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Education.





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