Courts blocked President Trump's attempt to ban transgender individuals from serving in the military.

President Trump speaks at a rally on Wednesday in Nashville. He vowed that he would fight for the White House travel ban all the way to the Supreme Court if necessary. AP / Mark Humphrey

In July, President Donald Trump decided he wanted to ban transgender individuals from serving in the military via his signature method of communication: Twitter. By August, he signed a presidential memo which would exclude transgenders from entering the military and ensure military funds would not fund sex reassignment surgery.

But on Monday, a federal court put a stop to the president’s attempt to rescind the community’s rights to serve their country.



“The court finds that a number of factors—including the sheer breadth of the exclusion ordered by the directives, the unusual circumstances surrounding the President’s announcement of them, the fact that the reasons given for them do not appear to be supported by any facts, and the recent rejection of those reasons by the military itself — strongly suggest that Plaintiffs’ Fifth Amendment claim is meritorious,” wrote Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly, who presided over the case, in a 76-page memo.

Within the pages, the judge notes the motive for Trump’s July tweet was composed at random and the basis for his claim transgenders shouldn’t serve was unsubstantiated.

“As far as the court is aware at this preliminary stage, all of the reasons proffered by the president for excluding transgender individuals from the military in this case were not merely unsupported, but were actually contradicted by the studies, conclusions and judgment of the military itself,” she said in reference to a 2016 military study during Obama’s presidency.

The study was the inspiration behind the government’s decision to allow transgenders to enroll in the military.

The story is still developing and will be updated. 





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