HB2
Republican leaders Rep. Tim Moore, left, and Sen. Phil Berger, hold a news conference in Raleigh, N.C. Chris Seward/The News & Observer via AP, File

Republican lawmakers in North Carolina and Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper have reached a legislative deal over the state’s “bathroom bill,” bringing in a new compromise measure that would repeal HB2, which the LGBTQ community has criticized as discrimintory, but would leave state legislators in charge of policy on public multi-stall restrooms.

Local governments also couldn’t pass ordinances extending nondiscrimination covering things like sexual orientation and gender identity until December 2020. That temporary moratorium, according to House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger, would allow time for pending federal litigation over transgender issues to play out.



“Compromise requires give and take from all sides, and we are pleased this proposal fully protects bathroom safety and privacy,” Berger and Moore said in a prepared statement.

A vote on the new measure was expected to come on Thursday. But LGBTQ advocates were angered about the proposal and say it is really no compromise at all.

The late-night work came as the NCAA has said North Carolina sites won’t be considered for championship events from 2018 to 2022 “absent any change” in the March 2016 law known as House Bill 2, which it views as discrimination. The NCAA said decisions would be made starting this week on events. North Carolina cities, schools and other groups have offered more than 130 bids for such events.

The NCAA already removed championship events from the state this year because of the law, which limits LGBT nondiscrimination protections and requires transgender people to use restrooms in schools and government buildings corresponding to the sex on their birth certificate.

HB2 has prompted some businesses to halt expansions and entertainers and sports organizations to cancel or move events, including the NBA All-Star game in Charlotte. An Associated Press analysis this week found that HB2 already will cost the state more than $3.76 billion in lost business over a dozen years.

“At its core, it’s a statewide prohibition on equality,” Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin told reporters earlier Wednesday as details of the proposal began surfacing. “Just like we did with … McCrory, we will hold all elected officials accountable — Democrats and Republicans — who target our community by advancing this statewide ban on nondiscrimination protections.”


With Reporting by AP



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