White Nationalist Leader Seeks to “Take Over the GOP”

Patrick Casey, executive director of white nationalist group Identity Evropa

Patrick Casey, 29, executive director of white nationalist group Identity Evropa attended the Conservative Political Action Conference earlier this year with plans to infiltrate conservative circles to “take over the GOP as much as possible,” according to NBC News.

CPAC, the largest gathering of conservative supporters in the country is where Casey set out to spread his brand of white nationalism including: only allowing white immigrants into the country to remain a “supermajority,” NBC News reported.



The 800 member group who participated in the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va. last year, believes that ethnic diversity damages the country and that whites should live among whites in North America, Western Europe, Australia and South Africa.

This was the same white supremacist rally that claimed the life of counter protestor 32-year-old Heather Heyer.

“Ethnic diversity has been proven time and time again in many studies to be very detrimental for social cohesion, social capital, and it’s just not a good model for society,” Casey said to NBC News.

Casey believes his plan of being a covert “white supremacist” will work to grab the reigns of the Republican party. His tactics include: no visible tattoos, good grooming, only conservative clothing.

“I didn’t walk in there with, you know, an Identity Evropa flyer pasted on my forehead or anything,” Casey said. “But I did have many great conversations with particularly the younger attendees, college Republican types.”

Casey and members of Identity Evropa are hitting college campuses across the country from San Diego State University to New York University, targeting young republican clubs to recruit potential members and to blend in.

NBC News reported that they want to use these groups and the legitimacy of higher education to be their stepping stone into politics.

“These are very smart, very savvy groups and that’s one of the things that differentiates them from groups of the past,” Cynthia Miller-Idriss, a professor of education and sociology at American University said to NBC News. “You can’t just write them off as ignorant thugs.”

 

 

 





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