More developments are expected to be formally announced regarding the Flint water crisis.

The latest involves six state employees who were criminally charged for their role in contaminating the city's drinking water Friday.

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services workers Nancy Peeler, Corinne Miller and Robert Scott, and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality employees Leanne Smith, Adam Rosenthal and Patrick Cook, are among those being held responsible for Flint water crisis.

The Detroit Free Press reports that Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette and Royal Oak Attorney Todd Flood, have called an 11:30 a.m. news conference at U-M Flint to give more details.



Schuette announced felony charges against two Michigan Department of Environment Quality officials and one City of Flint official in April. At that time, he announced that more criminal charges would be coming.

Mike Glasgow, the city employee, pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor and is cooperating with the investigation. As a result, other charges against him were dropped.

The two DEQ employees are awaiting preliminary examinations. Schuette later brought a civil lawsuit against engineering and consulting firms associated with the Flint Water Treatment Plant.

The civil lawsuit accuses engineering firm Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam and environmental consultant Veolia North America, plus related companies, of causing "the Flint Water Crisis to occur, continue and worsen."

Both companies have denied any wrongdoing and vowed to fight the lawsuit. In 2014, Flint's drinking water became contaminated after the city switched from treated water supplied from Detroit to raw water from the Flint river. At the time, the city's drinking supply was being controlled by a state-appointed emergency manager.

As a result, lead from pipes, joints and fixtures in Flint households contaminated the residents' drinking water. Harmful lead levels in Flint children also spiked.

Click here to watch a live streaming of the press conference. 

Photo: Attorney Bill Schuette, AP Images

 



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