This is the year of the woman in politics with record gains and historic runs to sit in the top elected seats the country has to offer — and Republican women, more specifically Black Republican women want in. Meet the six women who want to take their conservative values to Washington starting with Mia Love seeking reelection for a third term in Utah.

Congresswoman Mia Love is running for reelection in Utah’s 4th Congressional District

Running for reelection, Mia Love, made history when she became the first Black female Republican elected to Congress and the first Haitian American elected to Congress from the state of Utah in 2015. Prior to that she served as mayor of Saratoga Springs, Utah from 2010-2014. She defeated her Democratic opponent Doug Owens twice in 2014 and 2016 to win her second term. The Hill reported that her challenger Democrat Ben McAdams is leading her in the polls by six points as of October 2018.

Aja Smith is running for California’s 41st Congressional District

Aja Smith grew up in Moreno Valley, Calif., raised by both her mother and grandmother who worked long hours as nurses, providing for her and ensuring she had every opportunity that her peers had, according to Smith. Both of Aja’s grandparents served in the U.S. Military. Her grandfather was a veteran of WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. Her great uncle was a Tuskegee Airman pilot. In 2002, Smith joined the United States Air Force Reserve. In 2007, she was deployed to Qatar and stationed at Al-Udeid Air Force Base during Operation Enduring Freedom. If elected, Smith would become the first African-American female Republican to serve in Congress from California.

Virginia Fuller is running for Florida’s 5th Congressional District

Virginia Fuller, a registered nurse by trade immigrated to the United States in 1976, gaining her  citizenship in 2000.  For nearly 38 years she’s lived in California, but now a happily transplanted Floridian for the last two years, according to Fuller. In 1989, she established and operated two pediatric care facilities. One was a 24-hour Emergency Shelter Home for abused and neglected children located in Oakland, Calif. The other was an Extended Nursing Care Facility in Richmond, Calif. licensed by the State Health Department.

Liz Matory is running for Maryland’s 2nd Congressional District

Liz Matory is a small business owner and author of ‘Born Again Republican,’ the book about what she learned after leaving the Democrat Party, connecting with voters as an independent and discovering that she is a conservative. Matory has said that she is on a mission to encourage more people to learn the truth about the democrat’s agenda to diminish the Republic and degrade the power of the voters through partisan gerrymandering. After running for Congress in 2016, she became very active in party building efforts across the state with the Maryland Federation of Republican Women and the Maryland Republican Party.

Jineea Butler is running for New York’s 13th Congressional District

Jineea Butler is a social worker by trade from Cherry Hill, N.J. In 2007, Butler started her company the Social Services of Hip Hop where she introduced her Leaders In Training Music Program throughout New York City Schools. She boasts the creation of the Hip Hop Union claiming it has had national and international impact and celebrated its eighth anniversary in 2017.

Charlotte Bergmann is running for Tennessee’s 9th Congressional District

Born and raised in Memphis, Tenn., Bergmann describes herself as a devout Christian. She retired from FedEx in 2000, as a Technology Project Manager and now she runs a “small family business.” She said she plans to help push legislation to insure that healthcare is affordable and ultimately the responsibility of the doctor and the patient, without government intervention. “I am proud to say that I am a steadfast supporter of President Donald J. Trump. I stood in the rain holding the Trump/Pence signs and organized rallies during the Tennessee elections because I believed Trump would win in order to Make America Great Again.”



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